College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs -- Faculty Papers -- Pierre de Vise papers

Institution: University of Illinois at Chicago - Special Collections and University Archives
Address:
Richard J. Daley Library
801 S. Morgan St., Room 3-330
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: 312-996-2742
Website
Date: 1965-2001
Extent: 57 Linear Feet
Finding Aid

Abstract
Biographical/Historical Note:
Pierre de Vise was a sociologist and taught at UIC, DePaul University, and Roosevelt University. In 1967, he published what has now become a classic study called "Chicago's Widening Color Gap", which is where Chicago's reputation for being the most segregated city in America comes from. In 1985, de Vise wrote about the expansion of the urban poor, particularly what he named the "litany of increasing fractions", with a fourth of residents in poverty, half of all youth on welfare, two-thirds of black infants born out of wedlock and four fifths of public school students from minority groups. He is also noted for a 1970 study of health care in Cook County; a 1980 study on school finance that concluded that Chicago Public Schools were not run to help students; and a 1992 study that showed the disparity between Kenilworth, the 6th richest municipality in the country, and Ford Heights, oft noted for being America's poorest suburb.

Scope and Content Note:
This collection contains the research files of sociologist Pierre DeVise. It includes published articles, chapters, working papers, reports and speeches. It also includes the research materials, graphs, data and illustrations that were gathered as part of the research. The collection also includes background research, notes and testimony prepared by De Vise when he was called as an expert witness during court proceedings over urban planning disputes in the Chicago area. The collection contains De Vise's notes, papers and dissertation from his PhD studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago as well as his lecture notes, reading lists and syllabi from classes that he taught at UIC, Roosevelt University and DePaul University. DeVise published on a wide variety of topics, and the collection includes material on segregation in Chicago, the economies of Chicago and the surrounding suburbs, poverty in Chicago, the health care system in Chicago (including the Chicago Regional Hospital Study), urban planning in Chicago, demographic trends in Chicago and the conditions of cities across the country.

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